Friday, 23 January 2015

Veal T-bone Piccata

I have already preached about more sustainable consumption of meat: utilizing every part of the animal and favouring domestic, locally (and if possible, organically) reared meat. But I'm by no means perfect. Oh, no. I have my weaknesses and most of them meat-related. One of the biggest one is Iberico pork, Spain's gift to gourmands everywhere. Its texture, colour and taste are quite simply in a league of its own.

When Familia offered a selection of their products to try, I didn't have to think twice. Not after I saw Iberico on the menu. So, stay tuned for at least Iberico pork cheeks! This time up though: veal T-bone steaks. 

Familia sources ethically produced meat from all over the world, from Iberico to duck and game and for those in the market for something a bit more exotic: kangaroo!

Term piccata refers to the method the meat is cooked in: a boneless piece of meat (fillet) is pounded thin, drenched in flour, excess shaken off and then off to a hot pan (and oil and butter, of course) it goes. The flavours left on the pan are utilized by glazing the pan with with white wine and lemon juice after which the taste is rounded off with butter (and often with capers and fresh herbs) and the sauce is then poured over the meat. Quick and easy even for a weekday feast! T-bone steaks (as any meat with the bone still on it) are packed with meaty juiciness.

Instead of veal you could use chicken or fish.

Serves 2

Veal T-bone steaks:

2 veal T-bone steaks
(flour)
salt, black pepper

For frying: 1 generous tbsp butter and another one of oil 

As with all the meat, take it into room temperature at least half an hour before cooking. Season generously and (is using) drench in flour, shaking off the excess. Flour helps the browning, gives the meat a crisp exterior and helps thicken the sauce, too. Heat oil and butter in a pan and cook the steaks over high heat, 3 minutes per side. Remove from the pan and keep covered while you make the sauce.

Lemon, caper and parsley sauce:

1/4 dl dry white wine
1 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 lemon, thinly sliced
25 g (small) capers
100 g butter
salt, pepper
1,5 tbsp chopped fresh parsley

After removing the meat, pour in white wine and lemon juice to glaze the pan. Bring to boil and then add lemon, capers and butter. Continue cooking for a couple of minutes after the butter has melted, which in parsley, check the taste and season as needed. Pour over the meat and serve. With pasta... or butter bean mash!

Butter bean mash:

75 g butter
2 tins (á 400 g) butter beans (also known as lima beans)
2 tsp finely grated lemon zest
pinch of cumin
1,5 tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley
25-50 g butter (or 0,75-1 dl oil) for finishing
salt, black pepper

Heat butter in a small pot. pour in drained beans and cook until piping hot. Mash with your preferred method, add lemon zest, cumin and parsley and enough butter/ oil for the desired consistency. Check the taste and season. 




The most common wine pairings for veal piccata are light, citrusy, non-oaky Chardonnay or, if you want to go for red, Brunello di Montalcino. Instead of a trip to the liquor store we raided our own stash (which the recent holidays have seen being re-stocked!) and came up with these two instead. The acidity of Australian Jacob's Creek Semillon Chardonnay worked with the citrusy, acidic notes of the dish itself, whereas this French Pinot Noir from Les Carabènes balanced them, making the overall impression softer. I liked them both, The Boy Next Door didn't like either. I win. 




PS. All the efforts and money spent on my photography equipment is clearly starting to pay off: it only took one shot to get the photo for the recipe. Which means... wait for it... The Boy Next Door finally got to eat his dinner warm!


*In cooperation with Familia*

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ANYONE FOR SECONDS?



      

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